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Jonas Halstead

Male 1611 - 1683  (72 years)


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  • Name Jonas Halstead 
    Born 16 Feb 1610/11  Northowram, Halifax Parish, West Ridings, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 11 Jun 1683  Hempstead, Queens (now Nassau) Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried UNKNOWN  Hempstead, Queens (now Nassau) Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • [1.ged]

      Notes contained in Ken Erd's e-mail to John P. Halstead 11 Feb
      2000:"Atten: John P.
      I wanted to thank you for the insert you sent me, and I
      thought perhaps you would like to see how that fills out the
      notes in my file on Jonas Halstead.

      Ken
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      By 1642 Jonas was settled at Stamford, Ct. Stamford was first
      settled in 1641 by 29 persons who left the Weathersfield
      Church. The first year, Stamford, was called, Rippowam, an
      Indian name. Later Jonas lived at Hempstead, Jamaica, and
      Oyster Bay, New York. Jonas owned land, property, cattle and
      served at different times as constable and overseer (now a
      superintendent).
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      JONAS HALSTEAD born about 1610; m. about 1632; died about 1683.
      May have been from the West Riding of Yorkshire in North
      England. He may have settled first at Stamford Conn., later
      moving to Long Island, where his name appears on the earliest
      list of proprietors in the Hempstead town records. He was
      probably one of the fifty original proprietors of 1644. "All of
      the Halsteads living up and down the Hudson in 1790 were
      decedents of this Jonas." JONAS HALSTEAD removed to Oyster Bay
      about 1660, and in about 1667 to Jamaica (Long Island, New
      York). He served as Constable and Overseer at Oyster Bay and
      as Overseer at Jamaica. He owned property, land and cattle in
      the various communities in which he lived and was a highly
      respected citizen. He returned to Hemstead, L.I. and died
      there about 1683.
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      JONAS HALSTEAD appears in the second book of Hempstead, Long
      Island, as a witness as of December 8, 1655. He was in
      Hempstead for some part of the preceding year, but probably not
      before 1647. About 1660 Jonas removed to Oyster Bay and
      shortly after to Jamaica, Long Island. He returned to
      Hempstead.
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      JONNAH HALSTEAD, the first authentic ancestor found on record,
      settled at Hempstead, Long Island. The town records of that
      place show that he became the owner of "eight acres and sixty
      square rods of land lying at ye head of Cow Neck, part of a
      card of fifteen acres" which had belonged to Thomas Eleson, one
      of the original proprietors of Hempstead; in 1657 he is
      mentioned as having eight head of cattle turned onto the Neck;
      the date of his death is not found, nor his wife's name. Issue
      among others, a son.
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      JONAS HALSTEAD was the immigrant ancestor of the most numerous
      branch of the Halstead family. He came to Hempstead when
      middle Long Island was a frontier. It is quite possible that
      he was first at Stamford, Connecticut, as the historian Orcutt
      says that Jonas Halstead was there early. The old Dutch and
      English colonial records and the first town records of
      Hemstead, Oyster Bay and Jamaica provide all the information
      that is to be found about Jonas and his family. It is believed
      that he was born about 1610, was married about 1632, that all
      his children were born by 1644, and that he died about 1683.
      Undoubtedly he came to America from England, but what members
      of his family he first brought there, at what time and by what
      means are unknown. It is probable that he was from the West
      Riding of Yorkshire, in the north of England, the same district
      from which the first Halsteads in New England probably came,
      and to whom he may have been related. No facts have as yet
      been found to connect him in relationship with any of the known
      English Halsteads or the other Halstead immigrants to America.
      The first book of records of Hempstead, covering the period
      from its English settlement until 1655, has been lost. The
      earliest record of Jonas Halstead is in the next, succeeding
      book, where his name appears as a witness to a land deed as of
      December 8, 1655. He was in Hempstead for some part of the
      preceding eleven years, but probably not earlier than 1647,
      when sixty-six citizens were given their portion of the common
      land holdings, in the list of which his name does not appear.
      Again, he was one of thirty-six citizens of Hempstead who, on
      July 4, 1656, addressed a joint letter to Governor Peter
      Stuyvesant on the subject of the town's taxes to the province.
      About 1660 Jonas removed to Oyster Bay and shortly thereafter
      to Jamaica. He is referred to in a deed dated May 30, 1667,
      as, "Jonas Halstead of Stratton Island, within the county of
      York in America." He may have lived on "Stratton
      Island"(Staten Island) for a short time, but in December of the
      same year he was a resident of Oyster Bay. He returned to
      Hempstead, but his name disappears from all records after 1682,
      from which fact it is supposed that he died there shortly
      thereafter, seventy or more years of age. There is no record
      left either of his will or the administration of his estate. In
      the town records of Oyster Bay, there is a deed executed by him
      on December 5, 1661 in which the property conveyed is described
      as:

      " ...Richard Houlbrooke house or houses built by him and me and
      house lot & two sheres of meadow on ye North Side of ye youne
      and one right of meadow at the South fours and twenty Ackers of
      ye great plains, it is on ye East side of ye foot path near ye
      woods edgg."
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      There is a record at Oyster Bay as of March 8, 1666:

      "These may Sertifie to all whome it may any ways conseren yt I,
      Jonas Halstead, Constable have made a Legall Seasure of ye two
      Shipps which do belong to Major Daniel Gotherson for an in
      behalfe of Matthew Pryer for a debt which is due him from said
      Getherson."
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      The town of Oyster Bay ordered on December 11, 1667:

      "...yt ye Constable and Overseer shall make a Levie on ye Towne
      for 6 pounds Which is dew Jonas Holstead for ye higher (hire)
      of ye forte Neck.
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      At Jamaica, March 6, 1674: "At a toune Meeting Jonas Holsteade
      and John Foster were appointed to go to Mister Pek or any
      other minister that may be procured to come and live amongst us
      as our Minister.
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      The town of Jamaica elected Jonas overseer on April 13, 1675:
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      "The Toune did make choice of Samuel Smith for Constable and
      Jonas Holstead overseer for ye year ensuing.
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      Jonas Halstead and his son Timothy were overseers of the estate
      of Thomas Carle, the husband of Jonas' daughter Sarah. On May
      1, 1676, Jonas made an agreement for the management of the
      Carle farm with James Bate, which read in part:

      "...I dwo Ingeage to provid fodder for the Catell and to loock
      after them in winter & to provid what firewood is nedfull for
      the house also I dwos Ingeage to keep the fence in Repairs...&
      the said Jonas Hallstead is to pay Jeames beat forte shillings
      a yeare during the term of three years... and the said Jeames
      beat is to have for his Pains a third part of what Corn and
      pumkins that is produced of the land & he is to provid a third
      part of the sed... & the said Jonas Hallstead is to provid &
      maintain six oxen for the term and cart and plow & all tacklin
      neseary...allso the widow's soens is to join the said Jeames
      for the carrying on of the worke & Jeames beat is to provid
      what bous and youchs is nedfull for the oxen & and the said
      Jonas Hallstead is to provid one hors for Jeames use...and he
      is to have his dyat washing and lodging..."
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      The remainder of the records show Jonas Halstead as one of the
      owners of both land and cattle in the several communities in
      which he lived; as the recorder of an earmark for cattle; as a
      member of town committees; as a juror, and as a citizen
      actively generally in village affairs. It would seem that he
      was successful, trustworthy and well respected. The identity of
      Jonas' wife, when and where she was born, and when they were
      married are not known. There are no records of her at
      Hemstead, Oyster Bay or Jamaica. Inasmuch as both her eldest
      daughter, and her son Timothy' eldest daughter were named
      Sarah, it is to be supposed that her name was Sarah also. The
      history and genealogical record of the first five generations
      of the Jonas Halstead branch of the family that follow,
      limited, except in a few instances, to those who were born as
      Halsteads, has been prepared in part from authentic
      information, but much of it is conjectural. No public records
      were kept in that period, as there are now, of births and
      deaths, and the marriage records are incomplete. In
      consequence, it is necessary to calculate many of the dates
      given on the basis of probability from the fragmentary data now
      obtainable. Some individuals of whom there is a definite
      record, but no proof of parentage, have been assigned to
      certain families in the same way. Subsequent exploration will
      probably result in some revision of the tabulation. The first
      date given is the year of birth, actual if known, and if not,
      it is a calculated one. The second date is the year of death,
      determined in the same ways, and if followed by an &, it is
      only the last year in which the individual is known to have
      been alive from having been mentioned in some will, land deed
      or like recorded document. When a date is omitted, there is no
      known means of even approximating it. Jonas Halstead had four
      known children, Timothy, Sarah, Joseph and Martha.
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      Additional information was added to the Halstead files on 30
      Aug 1999. This material is from the files of Elaine Holstead.
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      Also from Elaine: By 1642 Jonas was settled at Stamford Ct.
      Stamford was first settled in 1641 by 29 persons who left the
      Weathersfield Church. The first year Stamford was called
      Rippowam, an old Indian name. Later, Jonas lived at Hempstead,
      Jamaica, and Oyster Bay, New York. Jonas owned land, property,
      cattle, and served at different times as constable and overseer
      ( now known as superintendent.)
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      The long civil war that existed in England, and English
      America, during the time of the Commonwealth, had wrought many
      changes in Hempstead. This English town located within the
      bounds of a Dutch colony, was a place of safety for the
      Staffordshire loyalists. Hence we find during the years 1643 to
      1660 a marked increase therein of families whom the
      Staffordshire-Shropshire records disclose to be closely
      related. There was also quite a few of their Old Welsh
      neighbors and relatives who came to this comparatively peaceful
      town on the plains of Long Island. In England these men had, as
      we have seen, been taught that membership
      in the Episcopal Church was the outward sign of loyalty to the
      crown and many of them were sincerely attached to the
      Established Church of England. They were therefore restless
      under the ministrations, or rather want of ministrations of the
      Presbyterian Church, for at this time the Presbyterians had
      grown to be very lax in their church duties.
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      From E-mailed photocopy from John P. Halstead:
      "Jonas Halstead, baptized in Halifax parish 23 February
      1611, was identified by Wardwell as the Jonas Halstead who
      settled in Hempstead, Long Island. Exactly when and how he
      came to the New World is unknown. His name does not appear
      with the Halsteads and Bairstows in Watertown, now with the
      Mitchell-Wood-Lum cluster in Wethersfield, Stamford or at the
      foundation of Hempstead in 1644. He appears to have only come
      to Hempstead at a late date; he first appears in the records
      there in December 1655. By this time the Mitchells were
      settled in Stamford; the children of Edmund Wood lived mostly
      in Southampton, and John Lum was also there; only Jeremiah Wood
      remained in Hempstead. It does not appear, Therefore,that
      Jonas Halstead was seeking to join them. Indeed, one would
      have to suppose that he did not share that same conservative
      Puritan orientation, since he moved to a town known for its
      libertine religious atmosphere. Hempstead in the 1650's was
      the haven for many dissidents who had been forced to leave New
      England .
      "During the next twenty years Jonas Halstead appears as a
      resident of Hempstead, Oyster Bay, Jamaica. He is once listed
      as an inhabitant of 'Stratton Island.' Seversmith explains,
      'he appears to have been a speculator in land.' He also
      writes, 'It is our opinion that he died in the late part of
      1683.' (Colonial Families, p 1259).
      "The name of the wife of Jonas Halstead was not known to
      the earlier genealogists. In 'The Ancestry of Arthur Brewster
      Lawrence' (Ms. 1984) advances the possibility that it was
      Sarah. He notes that when Thomas Carle, the son-in-law of
      Jonas Halstead, purchased a house and land in Hempstead on 27
      February 1656, the witnesses signed 'Sarah Hallsteade' and 'The
      X Marck of Joseph Hallsteade.' (HTR 1:435-6). Since Thomas
      Carle married Sarah, the daughter of Jonas Halstead, it had
      been supposed by the earlier authorities that she was the one
      who witnessed this deed. However, as Macy points out, Sarah
      (Halstead) Carle always signed with her mark. It seems
      possible, therefore, that this 'Sarah Hallsteade' was the wife
      of Jonas.
      "It is stated by Seversmith and others that Jonas Halstead
      was the father of Martha, wife of Jonathan Mills. In the same
      work, Harry Macy has shown that it is more likely she was the
      daughter of Timothy Wood. (see p. 9, supra).
      "Children:
      i. Timothy, b c.1636, d. Mar. 1705; of Hempstead, m.
      a daughter of Moyles and Ann (Pankhurst) Williams
      (Rec 11984)
      ii Sarah, b c.1638, m c1659, Capt Thomas Carle.
      iii Joseph, b. c1640, d 1679, of Jamaica, m c1669,
      Susannah Harcourt, who
      m (2) Peter Stringham (Rec 66:90)."
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      Appearing in the margins of the above document are some
      handwritten notes (possibly by John P. Halstead).
      Related to the note mentioning Michael Barstow, husband of
      Grace Halstead,
      is "in NE. 1636."
      Related to the note on Susan(na) is the notation, "in NE
      1636"
      Along side the note mentioning John Lum in Hempstead is
      "not the son of John
      Lum who married Susan Whitley Halstead"
      Above a carat in the entry for daughter of Moyles and Ann
      Williams is the name
      "Hannah."
      There are two other marginal notes that are not readable..
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      THE FIFTY ORIGINAL PROPRIETORS

      OF HEMPSTEAD
      1.Jermiah Wood
      2.Mr. Carman-SeeCarman Family History -Website
      3.Richard Gildersleve
      4.Mr Rainer
      5.Mr. Coe
      6.Mr. Tappen
      7.Mr. Ogden
      8.Mr. Stickling
      9.Mr. Fordum
      10.John Lawrence
      11.Jonas Wood Halefax
      12.William Washbourn
      13.John Seaman and
      14.Robert Dean
      15.John Roads
      16.Richard Ogden
      17.Stephen Hudson
      18.Thomas Irland-Ireland Family-website
      19.Richard Valentine
      20.William Thickstone
      21.Nicholas Tanner*
      22.Richard Willits
      23.John Cornis
      24.Edmond Wood
      25.Jonas Wood Orum
      26.John Smith Jun
      27.Thomas Armitage
      28.William Rogers
      29.--
      30.--
      31.--
      32.Simon Searing
      33.Timothy Wood
      34.John Smith Senior
      35.John Fooks
      36.Thomas Foster
      37.John Lum
      38.Christopher Foster
      39.Samuel Clark
      40.Robert Jackson
      41.Thomas Wilks
      42.Robert Williams
      43.Henry Pearsall
      44.Moyles Williams
      45.Daniel Whitehead
      46.Joseph Scot
      47.Henry Whitson- DEVOTED TO HENRY WHITSON- AND HIS DESCENDENTS
      48.William Thorne
      49.Thomas Shearman
      50.John Hews
      William Lawrence, Rober Ashman, and William Herrick are
      believed to be the missing three.
      The above taken from THE NASSAU COUNTRY HISTORICAL JOURNAL/A
      Quarterly Devoted to Nassau County Life and Letters./
      Vol.XVIII/ Summer, 1957, /No.3
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      The name of Jonas Halstead does not appear in this list."
      [see also, note under category "Marriage"] Jesse Mae and Alice
      Halsted "13 Generations" do not really address the emigration
      from England to New England, but simply note he was born and
      baptized in Halifax, Yorkshire, England; and "Came to
      Hempstead, Long Island, N.Y. in 1651." Seversmith, p. 1,257
      states: "From Stratford he removed to Hempstead, New York,
      where he was witness to a deed in December 1655." "Arthur S.
      Wardwell wrote about 1942 that Jonas Halstead is said to have
      been an early settler of Stratford, Conn. and seemed to agree
      with what W.L.Halstead had written in 1934. ...Some time later,
      as a result of further research, Wardwell modified his previous
      statements and wrote that there was a possibility Jonas
      Halstead came to New England along with Thomas Armitage and
      other families from Yorkshire, England, on a ship, the "James"
      of Bristol, which arrived on August 17, 1635."
      Quoting an e-mail of Oct 1999 from John Preston Halstead IV,
      "With regard to Jonas: for a variety of reasons, Art Wardwell
      concluded that both the Matthew Mitchell and Edmond Wood
      families emigrated on the "James" of Bristol in 1635 and that
      Jonas Halstead was a member of the Edmond Wood party. (See
      letters from Art Wardwell to Herb Seversmith, copies being sent
      by snail mail) as well as Matthew Wood's article in the NYG&B
      Record, Jan.1989 - Apr. 1990, "English Origins of Mitchell,
      Wood, Lum and Halstead Families"). Although Matthew Wood does
      not accept Wardwell's conclusion about Jonas Halstead's
      emigration, he doesn't disprove it. In fact, he doesn't even
      deal with it, which leaves Wardwell's conjecture standing, in
      my opinion." Jonas, it appears, came to New England with the
      Mitchell, and Wood families.
      ***Caution***Again you are cautioned, this is supposition
      by Wardwell***Caution***
      "Jonas and the Butterfield girl were already interested in each
      other. They were together on the long trip across the water to
      N.E. and both families went to Springfield then called Agawam."
      [My atlas shows Agawam separate from but neighboring
      Springfield, Hampden County, Mass] "They lived there by May
      1636 and were still there in July. There was no minister at
      Agawam so the young couple could not have married there. At
      Agawam, Matthew Mitchell, Samuel Butterfield and Edmund Wood
      were "On the Connecticut" and Jonas Wood "S of Mill River." The
      two families left Agawam very soon and went down the river to
      Wethersfield, [Hartford County, Connecticut] and I think it was
      not long before the young couple were married." "In the
      Wethersfield history is given a list of those who were to
      remove to Rippowarns [? there is a Rippowam river in
      Connecticut, just west of Stamford] - note from Ken Erd "By
      1642 Jonas was settled at Stamford, CT. Stamford was first
      settled in 1641 by 29 persons who left the Wethersfield Church
      ["The first year, Stamford, was called, Rippowam, an Indian
      name."] with Denton. It included the following:
      Edmund Wood
      Jeremy Wood
      Jonas Wood "Hal"
      Jonas Wood Jr This perhaps was Jonas Halstead
      who lived with Wood so long Jonas Wood "O" that
      he was thought a Wood" - Wardwell to Seversmith 1956
      Regarding the given name of Jonas' spouse - - - Butterfield,
      Wardwell notes on page four of this letter that "What name was
      given to the Butterfield girl when she was born in 1615? Susan
      Wood [Butterfield-Mitchell] named a daughter by Matthew
      Mitchell Sarah in 1621. If she had a daughter Sarah Butterfield
      aged about 6 do you think she would have given Sarah as the
      name to the Mitchell child.[?]" "I am inclined to drop Sarah as
      the suggested name for the wife of Jonas Halstead. What do you
      think?"
      [On the other hand, Susan Butterfield-Mitchell named her 4th
      child Susan b. ca 1631 when Jonas' wife would have been about
      12 years old, so who knows?]
      ***Caution***Again you are cautioned, this is
      supposition by Wardwell***Caution*** "Jonas and
      the Butterfield girl were already interested in each other.
      They were together on the long trip across the water
      to N.E. and
      both families went to Springfield then called Agawam."
      [My atlas shows
      Agawam separate from but neighboring Springfield,
      Hampden County,
      Mass] "They lived there by May 1636 and were still
      there in July. There
      was no minister at Agawam so the young couple could not
      have married
      there. At Agawam, Matthew Mitchell, Samuel Butterfield
      and Edmund
      Wood were "On the Connecticut" and Jonas Wood "S of
      Mill River." The
      two families left Agawam very soon and went down the
      river to Wethersfield,
      [Hartford County, Connecticut] and I think it was not
      long before the
      young couple were married."
      NYGBR v.119 [Apr 1988] no.2: Matthew Wood article "The Family
      of Moyles Williams, One Of The Original Proprietors of
      Hempstead, Long Island.",p.80:
      "The name "Moyles Williams" appears on a list of the
      original proprietors of Hempstead
      derived from the old "Mouse Eaten Book" of town records,
      which is now lost. The history of Moyles and his
      immediate family is exceedingly obscure,
      due to the fact he and his sons died in mid-life. There is
      only
      one other record from Long Island which refers to
      Moyles. In 1667 the heirs of
      "Michael Williams" quit-claimed their interest in the
      estate of Henry Pearsall,
      who had married their widowed mother Ann. Fortunately
      these notices can be
      enriched by reference back in New England. Moyles and
      Ann Williams of
      Hempstead are clearly identical to Michael and Ann
      [Pankhurst] Williamson of
      Ipswich, Massachusetts and Newport, Rhode Island. This
      fact has not been
      brought out in previous work on the subject." Matthew
      Wood's article states
      "By 1638 he [Michael Williamson] married Ann Pankhurst,
      born about 1619
      probably in Sussex, a 'cousin' of Dennis Geere and family
      whom she accompanied
      to Boston in 1635."
      In that Michael [Moyles] and Ann Williams are spoken of as "of
      Ipswich" and were apparently married prior to their
      immigration to Newport in 1638 it is felt safe to assume them
      to have married at Ipswich. further, in speaking of Jonas and
      the Butterfield girl in his conjectural exploration, Wardwell
      writes "...There was no minister at Agawam so the young couple
      could not have married there." - He must have been mistaken
      about this also [if his Agawam was really Ipswich] as Wood
      tells us that The Willaims/Williamsons were married after
      arriving at Ipswich, but prior to their 1638 immigration to
      Newport, than we must assume that there was a minister at
      Ipswich/Anguum/Agawam.
      John Preston Halstead, bless his heart, mailed me
      copies of the various Colonial maps, including "Connecticut and
      New Haven Colonies 1635-1660"
      [http://ancestry.com/search/rectype/reference/maps/freeimages.a
      sp?Imag eID=97] on which I note "[Agawam]" immediately below
      "Springfield". So apparently, at least to me, Wardwell was
      correctly talking of the Springfield area.
      Is this the way it appears to everybody/anybody else?
      Mark, I appreciate your sharing your thoughts with us - the
      more we question, the more we are able to learn and clarify
      issues such as this. Copied below, Mark's message:
      Hello Group,Some time ago, I read in Gary's notes that
      Jonas Halstead had spent sometime in Agawam,
      Massachusetts, before moving on to Wethersfield,
      Conn.,Stratford, Conn., Stamford, Conn., and finally to
      Long Island. I have just
      read something which talks about Agawam; I was wrong,
      it seems, in my
      placement of Agawam, and the "real" Agawam of the 1630s
      may tie Jonas in
      with Moylus/Michael Williams, father of his
      daughter-in-law.
      There exists today in Massachusetts a town called
      Agawam, in Hampden County, which sits near the
      Connecticut River, south of Springfield and pretty much right
      on the Connecticut border.
      When I read that Jonas had been in Agawam, it seemed to
      make sense to me that present-day Agawam is
      just upriver from Wethersfield, Conn. -- Jonas' next stop.
      However, in "The Times of Their Lives: Life, Love and Death in
      Plymouth Colony" by James Deetz and Patricia Scott Deetz (W.
      H. Freeman & Co., 2000), p. 51, it says: "Some of the party
      [the Mayflower passengers] urged that they go as far as
      'Anguum' or 'Angoum" (Agawam, today Ipswich, Massachusetts,
      north of Boston).
      It was decided in the end to settle somewhere else within
      the bay."So "Agawam" of those early days was not the Agawam of
      Hampden County, Mass., but rather what is today Ipswich, Mass.,
      which is just north of Gloucester, Mass. in Essex County.
      Coincidentally, according to Matthew Wood in his article "The
      Family of Moyles Williams, One of the Original Proprietors of
      Hempstead, Long Island" (NYG&B Record, 1988, pp. 80-84),
      Michael Williams (also Williamson), ". . . came to Boston in
      1635, as a servant of George Giddings, from St. Albans Parish,
      Hertfordshire, and settled with him in Ipswich, Massachusetts
      that year." Did Jonas know his future in-law early on in his
      life in America? Did they meet in Ipswich around 1635-38, and
      find each other again in Hempstead 7-10 years later?
      I guess the biggest question I would have is: What is the
      source of the "Jonas in Agawam" theory? From this,
      can we tell to which Agawam Jonas migrated? Both
      Agawams -- whether Essex or Hampden County locale -- would make
      sense. How can we find more?
      On another note, I met some wonderfully helpful folks at
      the Stratford [Connecticut] Historical Society a week
      or so ago, and they tried to track down old Jonas for me -- no
      luck. However, as with the official land records and vital
      records of the town, no record-keeping was done in earnest
      until about 1676 -- long after our man would have left there.
      They were as puzzled as I about the Orcutt listing of Jonas as
      an "early settler." His name does not appear on the earliest
      maps in (I think) 1649 -- but by then, of course, he was
      probably in Hempstead, or at least had moved on to Stamford by
      that time. They also looked through some of the earliest
      church records of Stratford for me, and still did not find
      anything, but I get the impression these records are also later
      than Jonas would have been there. Am I right in remembering
      the theory, that Jonas was in Stamford in the 1640s, possibly
      as early as 1641? More puzzles . . . . Mark Halstead
      ----------
      From: Gary A. HALSTEAD
      To: Benwaggi@aol.com
      Cc: Jshals127@aol.com; mhalstead@snet.net
      Subject: Re:Hester Halsted Ms
      Date: Friday, February 02, 2001 11:43 PM
      Guys:
      I have been doing a lot of thinking about the work
      ahead of us if we are to take on the challenge of "editing"
      Hester's work and assist in getting it published.
      a.] This is assuming that Hester is receptive to the
      idea at all - she may not be comfortable with anyone "playing
      surgeon" to her work and changing anything...in which case it
      [her work] remains as is [with errors].
      b.] we may still have a database that remains many
      mysteries - I feel that I have been very diligent on my
      documentation and data in my database - - - but how does one be
      certain? As I have reached quandaries that I have been unable
      to comfortably resolve - - - I have recorded all that I have
      gathered and includes sources, and then added my own
      reasoning and logic for any conclusion I have drawn...but to me
      it is still up for discussion...at least until the piece of
      "unrefutable" evidence surfaces.
      I am more than happy to assist in this venture - - -
      but really, the ball as I see it is currently still in Hester's
      court. If we do get involved with the project, there may be a
      need to be able to consult with Hester as we find varying data.
      Knowing, that to do a conscious job of comparing my
      database to Hester's certainly would not be a short term
      project - I just made a new gedcom of my database - - - 18,160
      people, 6,494 families, 472 sources, 25,553 events and a
      5.422MB file. That does include my mother's genealogy also, but
      in addition to that I also still have about 8 other Halstead
      gedcoms I am attempting to audit and merge into my database.
      Eventually, my database will include those others, plus
      anything I pickup from Hester's - - - but that could still be
      quite some time away.
      I guess, we'll keep
    Person ID I0671  Burr
    Last Modified 2 Nov 2002 

    Father Abraham Halstead,   b. 5 Sep 1570, Lancashire or Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Nov 1612, Northowram, Halifax Parish, West Ridings, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 42 years) 
    Mother Susanna Whitley,   b. 1 Feb 1571/72, Overden, Woreley, Halifax Parish, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Jul 1626, Northowram, Halifax Parish, West Ridings, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years) 
    Married 5 Sep 1596  Parish Church of Halifax, Lincoln, York, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F0248  Group Sheet

    Family Susan Butterfield,   b. 4 Apr 1615, Ovenden, Halifax Parish, West Ridings, Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1670, Hempstead, Queens (now Nassau) Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 54 years) 
    Married 1636  Wethersfield, Hartford Co., CT Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Timothy Halstead,   b. 1637, Wethersfield, Connecticut (then New Netherland) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1702/03, Hempstead, Queens (now Nassau) Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     2. Sarah Halstead,   b. Abt 1638, CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1683, Hempstead, Queens (now Nassau) Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 45 years)
     3. Joseph Wood Halstead,   b. 1642, Stratford, Fairfield Co., CT Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1679, Oyster Bay, Jamaica, Queens (now Nassau) Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years)
     4. Martha Halstead,   b. Abt 1644, Hempstead, New Netherland, [now Nassau Co., Long Island, NY] Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1710  (Age ~ 67 years)
     5. Martha Halstead,   b. Abt 1644, Hempstead, New Netherland, [now Nassau Co., NY) Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Aft 1710  (Age ~ 67 years)
    Last Modified 13 Jul 2014 
    Family ID F0246  Group Sheet


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